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Also, Pratchett makes too many jokes about fat people. Willikins the butler joins the militia in this book his immature gullible behavior seemed quite out of character in the sequels, especially In Thud! Also see "Jingo" illustration, created by Marc Simonetti, here: Oh--and Unseen Academicals is not really City Watch, but a few characters overlap.

Also, there are some spin-off books that cross-over with the "City Watch" sub-series. These books introduce new-fangled notions to the twin cities of Ankh-Morpork. Going Postal describes the invention and proliferation of postage stamps loved it and Making Money , depicts the creation of paper money to replace gold also very good.

Pratchett's last book in the series, and a little weak. Also, The Truth depicts the invention of a printing press and the subsequent introduction of widespread newspapers into society. Satire deals with the wholesale acceptance of lies when ink-validated. William de Worde he-he is the city's first investigative journalist, sleuthing out possible murder and a plot to overthrow Lord Vetinari. Finally, Moving Pictures introduces the film industry to the eager citizens of Ankh-Morpork.

This book does not include Moist Von Lipvig. I didn't care as much for it, but it's brimming with satire and some scenes are great. When I need something comfortable on a Sunday afternoon, I generally pick up a Terry Pratchett novel. I'm not sure why I opted for this one over all the others, since it's not one of my favorites--or maybe that's why; it came across as fresher than one I might have read more recently. In this novel, Pratchett skewers the idea of the noble war and the instinct of mankind to distrust and hate the Other. The appearance of a mysterious island sets Morporkians against Klatchians, despite the fact tha When I need something comfortable on a Sunday afternoon, I generally pick up a Terry Pratchett novel.

The appearance of a mysterious island sets Morporkians against Klatchians, despite the fact that most Klatchians living in Ankh-Morpork are second- or third-generation residents, and Sam Vimes and the City Watch end up at the center of the conflict. Vimes' insistence that he is not a military man sets up the premise that there is a difference between being a policeman and being a soldier, which plays out throughout the main plot. A secondary plot featuring Fred Colon and Nobby Nobbs being shanghaied by the Patrician and Leonard of Quirm at first looks like mere comedy Nobby as the dancing girl Beti makes me laugh every time but turns out to be key to the solution of keeping both countries from destruction.

This book mostly hits all the notes you expect from a City Watch novel for example, the inevitable kidnapping and hostage-holding of Angua but I'm struck by how powerful one aspect of the ending is. He chooses to pursue, but a fluke of temporal physics leaves him with the "Disorganizer" imp-powered planner, calendar, and all-around nuisance of the Vimes who stayed.

Having been instructed by the impatient Vimes to keep track of his appointments without Vimes having to tell him what they are, the imp begins reeling off events in that alternate-universe Ankh-Morpork--including, at the end, the deaths of officers Vimes cares about. The litany is sobering and makes the ending more serious, I think, than the rest of the book is capable of.

Jul 18, Melinda Snodgrass rated it it was amazing. I came to Terry Pratchett late which meant I have this lovely, long line of books to graze through. Pratchett's Discworld is just our world, but amplified by the presence of witches and wizards, and Death is a character, and a lovely old duffer with a charming, if prickly, granddaughter.

Rounding out the cast is the enigmatic ruler of THe Discworld's major city, and the various citizens of that city from thieves and beggars, and bankers, and trying to help keep order over this motley crew is the I came to Terry Pratchett late which meant I have this lovely, long line of books to graze through. Rounding out the cast is the enigmatic ruler of THe Discworld's major city, and the various citizens of that city from thieves and beggars, and bankers, and trying to help keep order over this motley crew is the Watch police under the command of Sam Vimes.

The Watch books are my favorites in the series. I have a soft spot and great admiration for police officers. They do a hard job. So, I was delighted to discover this was a Watch book. Jingo is a tale of how war fever sweeps through the city, and how suddenly the people who run the local curry shop are The Enemy, and how we sometimes fight over absurdities. It reads like a primer for the idiotic war in Iraq, and I wish someone had stuck it under Bush's nose. The book is LOL funny in places, and you find yourself nodding wisely at his incisive social commentary.

At any rate, if you haven't Pratchett you are missing a delight. Go and check himout. Dec 17, YouKneeK rated it really liked it Shelves: Jingo is the fourth book in the City Watch subseries of Discworld. In this book, a disagreement between fishermen in the middle of the sea between Ankh-Morpork and Klatch triggers buried resentments and prejudices among citizens of both places until it appears that war is inevitable.

As is common with this subseries, Jingo is the fourth book in the City Watch subseries of Discworld. As is common with this subseries, there was a little bit of a mystery involved, and that helped keep the story more interesting. Pratchett often uses humor to impart some sort of a message, and I thought this book was one of the better examples of that. I don't think I've ever laughed so much because of a book as I have with this one.

Terry Pratchett is a genius of comedic yet poignant writing. Which makes me that much sadder that he passed away. I would have never thought that the pairing Vetinari, Nobby, and Colon would ever happen o I don't think I've ever laughed so much because of a book as I have with this one.

I would have never thought that the pairing Vetinari, Nobby, and Colon would ever happen or work, but holy shit, so much gold. I could barely handle Nobby as Beti. Vimes and Carrot also continue to be national treasures. I do wish we'd take more focus on Angua, Cheri and Sybil. Hopefully, we'll get more of them, and maybe even have them interact in the next one. Dec 12, Carly rated it it was amazing Shelves: Excellent Vimes book, and good one to start with.

Pratchett's satire of racism, imperialism, and, as the title might suggest, jingoism. Also features fun with the split in the Trousers of Time, Vimes' struggles with his wife's well-meant gift of a Dis-Organizer, and an enjoyable submarine ride with only Leonardo de Quirm, crazy genius, Vetinari, tyrant, Sgt Colin, complete moron, and Nobby Nobbs, possibly human, as passengers.

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Also features Carrot, the unrecognized king of Ankh Morpork, acting hum Excellent Vimes book, and good one to start with. Also features Carrot, the unrecognized king of Ankh Morpork, acting human--he finally breaks his rule about not treating personal a completely separate issue than important. And Vimes has to ride a camel View all 8 comments. Even though I didn't remember a lot of this, despite it being one of my more recently read Discworld novels prior to the great TP read-through fulfilling my earlier prediction that I wouldn't remember any of the details for any length of time.

Because this worked for me a lot better the second time around, perhaps because I'm now reading the Discworld in order. I have a better understanding of the dynamics of the Watch, and the dyn Reread Bumping this up a star the second time through. I have a better understanding of the dynamics of the Watch, and the dynamics between Vetinari and Vimes. After all, when I first read this one, I hadn't read either Men at Arms or Feet of Clay, and while you can read TP out of order, and still understand, the Watch, the Witches and the Death books are all serialized. Rincewind technically is as well, but having started The Last Continent earlier today, I'm not convinced reading them in order would make much difference, except for maybe some of the scenes with the University wizards.

Also bumping this up, because that last scene between Vetinari and Vimes in the aftermath of the war is a delight. Particularly having just read Feet of Clay. I also really enjoyed Vimes realizing that he was technically a knight and could, nay was required to, start up his own regiment. The scene where he announces that to the war-mongering Lord Rust made me smile. Vimes may be my favourite single Discworld character, if I had to pick one.

Oh, and Vimes and 71 hour Ahmed, and Vimes and the Klatchians in general were great. Also, Lady Sibyl and Vimes continue to be one of my favourite things. Even the Angua plot hole felt like less of a plot hole this time around. I mean, it's sort of explainable, even if a few intermediate steps are missing in the text. But she's a werewolf, so clearly she could just find the Watch, even in the desert Also really, really enjoyed view spoiler [the continued tradition of books in the Watch subseries ending with Carrot arresting something ridiculous.

In this case, two armies. Part of it may be that I was reading this interspersed with a book club book that I'm struggling with and a cozy mystery that could have used an edit or two, and that sort of thing makes you realize how nice it is to read a book that just flows, and is enjoyable to read.

There is still a bit of a lull in the middle, but I enjoyed it. Thing is, I often enjoy Terry Pratchett. Particularly the books featuring either the Watch, or the witches. I like the books better when they're set in a familiar location. I really enjoyed the first half of this, with the watch sort of blundering around Ankh Morpok, with hilarious results. The Watch doing any kind of detective work is always fun! And I really enjoy Vimes and Sybil together.

I also really enjoyed the last sixty pages or so. Vimes' butler is particularly great. And Carrot has grown on me a lot. This book made me laugh out loud a number of times. But there is a lull in the middle. In the desert, outside of the familiarity of the setting, things drag. And some of the odd combinations of people didn't quite work. For example, I like Vetinari best when he's juxtaposed with Vimes, not Nobby. Also, there's a definite plot whole related to Anguna.

The other thing is, I suspect I won't rememmber more than a few details in a week. Because TP's books don't stay with me. I enjoy them while I read them, but they're often ephemeral. They're clever, extremely clever, and extremely entertaining, but sometimes they lack something in the core to centre around. There's a lack of character development, or something.

This is not always the case; when TP is at his best, the characters do drive the story, as opposed to the clever intellectual exercise cunningly dressed up in nonsense. Not that the intellectual exercise isn't fun, but in terms of a story , sometimes it's lacking. So I can't give the book four stars, much as I enjoyed it.

View all 9 comments. Feb 26, Fiona rated it really liked it Shelves: It's not very often in the next few months that I'm going to get to read a whole book in a day, so I thought, in for a penny, in for a pound, took a Sunday off and settled down with Commander Vimes and a bar of Dairy Milk.

It was a good choice. Of course it was. I've been recommended 'Jingo' several times, and it's perfectly obvious why: A lot of page time is spent on my favourite supporting cast Vetinari, Carrot, Angua and Lady Sybil gets a good few pages of being wonderful as well. Including one where she's haphazardly knitting.

As it is, I'm too busy giggling in glee at Carrot's myriad organisation of football matches. There seems to be a bit of a theme going on in my reading of late: Vimes is right up there with Atticus Finch in terms of really shiny upholders of the law, and in 'Jingo' the law-abiding, but also strongly pacifist, message is possibly the strongest I've ever seen it in a Pratchett book. Anyway, I loved it. It was a bit confusing at times - I still didn't completely get the whole business about 71 hours - hence four stars instead of five.

However, I think that's a long Sunday afternoon well spent. No es que no sea brillante, divertida tratando temas serios y con frases memorables, pero eso ya lo doy por hecho al leer a Pratchett, y las anteriores me dejaron mejores sensaciones. The sudden appearance of the lost island of Lesh triggers diplomatic tensions between the Ankh Morporkians and their neighbours from Klatsch and when diplomacy seems to fail spectacularly, the time has come to go to war. In Jingo, Pratchett takes full advantage of the story to aim his arrows on warfare and the bullshit reasons wars are started in the first place, all set against another mystery for the Guards to solve.

Sadly Angua takes a bit of a backseat thoughout this one, but Pratchett makes u The sudden appearance of the lost island of Lesh triggers diplomatic tensions between the Ankh Morporkians and their neighbours from Klatsch and when diplomacy seems to fail spectacularly, the time has come to go to war. Sadly Angua takes a bit of a backseat thoughout this one, but Pratchett makes up for it by having Cpl. Colon take on a secret mission for the Patrician. Luckily we can still count on the usual suspects to keep us entertained, like Detritus and the ever-stoic Cmdr Vimes: We have no men.

It is amazing what you can do with the right words.

I was about to say that we cannot afford mercenaries. He raised his hand and, on cue again, his clerk placed a piece of paper in it. Guild of Assassins…Gross earnings in the last year: Taxes paid in the last year: Frostrip of the Guild of Accountants. The task is to extract the maximum amount of milk with the minimum of moo. And I am afraid to say that these days all I get is moo.

Not the best novel in the series, but still entertainment gold. A strange foreign country across the sea, a moneyed aristocracy eager to send young men off to war, political operatives using a flimsy pretext to incite nationalist and racist fervor to encourage said war Sounds unpleasantly familiar, which is probably why I was drawn to reading this book. This is one of the Watch books in the Discworld series, and like so many of those books deals with the intersection between law and politics. In this case, a mysterious island surfaces halfway between the g A strange foreign country across the sea, a moneyed aristocracy eager to send young men off to war, political operatives using a flimsy pretext to incite nationalist and racist fervor to encourage said war In this case, a mysterious island surfaces halfway between the great city-state of Ankh-Morpork and the desert empire of Klatch.

Naturally, both nations claim the island as their own, and tempers flare. Status Terry Pratchett — primary author all editions calculated Ittekot, Venugopalan Translator secondary author some editions confirmed Kirby, Josh Cover artist secondary author some editions confirmed Planer, Nigel Narrator secondary author some editions confirmed Sabanosh, Michael Cover artist secondary author some editions confirmed. You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data. Lady Sybil Ramkin Vimes.

The Librarian of Unseen University wizard transformed into an orangutan. Ankh-Morpork, Discworld fictional city.

oxivecakyhub.ga: ¡Voto a Bríos! (Mundodisco 21) (Spanish Edition) eBook: Terry Pratchett: Kindle Store

Leshp, Discworld fictional island. To all the fighters for peace. It was a moonless night, which was good for the purposes of Solid Jackson. Oh yes, there were worse things they could do, but most of them began right when they started following bad orders. The task is to extract the maximum amount of milk with the minimum of moo.

And I am afraid to say that these days all I get is moo. It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things. This audio book has been produced under the auspices of the Ulverscroft Foundation, a registered UK charity which helps visually impaired people.

For more information, or if you wish to make a donation or a legacy, please contact: But that was later on - for now, gloriously uncomplicated and wonderfully clean, and hopefully with never and end, under a clear sky, in a world untarnished Please do not combine with either the play or the abridged audio.

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References to this work on external resources. Wikipedia in English None. Book description Discworld goes to war, with armies of sardines, warriors, fishermen, squid and at least one very camp follower. The enemy might be even worse. Never read a Discworld book? The closest comparison might be Monty Python and the Holy Grail , with its uniquely British sense of the absurd, and side-splitting, smart humor. Both cities claim it. Lord Vetinari, the Patrician, has failed to convince the Ruling Council that force is a bad idea, despite reminding them that they have no army, and "I believe one of those is generally considered vital to the successful prosecution of a war.

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