Guide The Good Thief: A Tale of Mercy

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It got a little too caught up in being "quirky," in my opinion, and the plot got a little strange and hard to follow.

There were exciting bits of it, but over all I thought it was just okay. It does have that epic adventure story feel about it, but in only pages it can't quite attain the scope of, say, Great Expectations. An enjoyable book, though. The Good Thief - Nevisande: Reader was very interesting and varied his voice for each character. The story itself was at times funny and sad at others. All in all, I found this audio book to be delightful to listen to and it held my interest, unlike others I have tried to listen to.

I have fallen asleep through 2 other audio books Mar 28, Amanda G. Here we have one of "those" books--an intriguing premise that could have delivered more. Ren, a one-handed orphan boy, learns the art of the con from a man who may or may not hold the answers to his past--namely, what happened to his parents, and what happened to his hand?

Since the con man is, well, a con man, Ren can never tell if he's being fed lies or the truth. Based on that synopsis alone, the book should have been great. Yes, the plot inches over the top by the end, but this tale is told Here we have one of "those" books--an intriguing premise that could have delivered more. Yes, the plot inches over the top by the end, but this tale is told in the tradition of the American "yarn for boys.

So why shouldn't our good thief Ren? But the comparison stops there. The accolades on the back cover "goes on my shelf next to Treasure Island! The historical setting is passably detailed yet less than immersing. Tension picks up toward the end, but conning a farmer into a meal and then riding off with his horse and wagon, befriending a chimney-climbing dwarf, being locked in a closet surrounded by candy--these things don't really qualify as "high adventure.

Still, Ren himself is capable of surprising glimmers of humanity. His actions and his desires do elicit sympathy, though his alleged search for the nature of morality is a theme only dented, not delved into. But Ren is the only character who doesn't produce a sense that I'm perhaps appropriately being conned--these are hastily sketched plot vehicles claiming to be carefully developed characters. This is a novel that shines sporadically. While its whole disappoints, some of its individual scenes feel genuine.

Not a bad book, nor a great one. A very enjoyable, almost pseudo-fantasy, kinda-sorta YA book. I avoided reading the inside cover and just dove into the book, not knowing a thing about it. This is an orphan escapes from his parentless, loveless world and lands amongst thieves, possibly with hearts of gold but likely not, sort of book. Definitely thinner than Dickens, but almost similar in feel. The main character, the orphan boy, is appealing, and the unfo A very enjoyable, almost pseudo-fantasy, kinda-sorta YA book.

The main character, the orphan boy, is appealing, and the unfolding adventures drew me in. I've read about Ms. Tinti's earlier "Animal Crackers" and have no desire to read it; I think this book is different and more appealing to those who may be turned off by "Animal Crackers.


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Sands's house, the hospital, the factory and in the graveyards are vivid and I had clear pictures of these places in my mind's eye. I look forward to reading her next book - she is an author to watch. After reading several good reviews, likening this work to Dickens or Mark Twain, I picked it up at the library. The orphanage, the hopeful young protagonist with a propensity towards petty theft, the handsome rake claiming to be a relation, the "con" jobs The young and hopeful orphan is Ren, who only has one hand, and the handsome conniving rake is Benjamin Nab.

After an "adoption" from the orphanage unde After reading several good reviews, likening this work to Dickens or Mark Twain, I picked it up at the library. After an "adoption" from the orphanage under the pretenses of a long-lost uncle, they team up with another con man and travel around New England swindling and conning the best scene for me was when they make an "elixir for misbehaving boys" and sell it at a town fair that essentially makes the kids high and strung out on opium before settling in to their new occupation of "resurrection men" - grave robbers for the local doctor's cadaver supply.

It was an entertaining read. I suppose I was expecting more from it, but it was enjoyable all the same. I enjoyed this novel mainly because of the prose. The first half was better than the second; I thought the plot devolved and became too convoluted by the end, when all I really wanted was to see the relationship between Benjamin and Ren grow. One thing I really appreciated was the author's complete disregard for obviously stating the time period of the novel possibly late s?

And I loved the descriptions of the monastery at the beginning. I rated this book 3. It's a story about a young boy named Ren living in an orphanage. He doesn't know how or why he is living there and he also doesn't know why he is living with only one hand. All he wants is to be adopted out before he turns 18 so he won't be forced into the service, to know who his parents are, to know why he is living with only one hand, and why he is in an orphanage.

This is somewhat like an "Oliver Twist" type story. It takes pla I rated this book 3. It takes place during the early 19th century. I plan on reading other stories by this author. Son errores que achaco al querer abarcar demasiado, sin embargo, aprecio buenas mimbres en la novela. Tinti tiene buenas ideas y las desarrolla con calidad, componiendo una novela que se lee con bastante placer si eres capaz de soportar sus idas de olla. I'm torn with this book - I liked the story and the main character, but the rest of the characters weren't very likable and the end of the book felt rushed.

It is an adventure story, complete with an orphan and everything: Ren is a one-handed klepto who has recently been sprung from a priest-run home for boys slash winery by a man named Benjamin claiming to be his brother who weaves a fantastical tale about their dead parents.

The Good Thief

He's brought along visuals. Two partial scalps to prove the massacre. Benjamin uses Ren as a sympathy lure, making it easier to s In "The Good Thief," Hannah Tinti has created the equivalent of a carnival moon walk for adults. Benjamin uses Ren as a sympathy lure, making it easier to steal a horse and cart from a farmer.

They join up with Benjamin's partner in crime, a bit of a booze hound, and take off for a fictitious East Coast town, where they make a living as grave robbers. This attracts the attention of Mr. McGinty, who runs the town with a band of heavies referred to as the "hat men," who hijack, beat, chase and threaten Ren et. Along the way, Ren befriends a killer giant who had been buried alive, a deaf landlady and a band of women who are employed at the mousetrap factory, a wily dwarf who lives on a roof, and Ren's two best friends from the orphanage, twin brothers. This is just a cute, cute story, a full on tug for the imagination.

A scene where Ren is being chased along the rooftops of North Umbrage is so exciting that I felt like a 10 year old curled up with one of those books that has the power to turn a casual reader into a voracious book freak. For all the charm, cleverness, and simplicity of language, this isn't my favorite genre as an adult. So I like what Tinti did, and I admire the way she pulled it off. And it brought back a lot of good memories about my first relationships with books.

But it probably won't land in my top ten. Y, como ingrediente secreto, unas gotas de Tim Burton. An orphan missing his left hand, mysteries, scoundrels, grave robbers and honor amongst thieves and a multitude of plots There were some richly drawn characters and while ultimately the story did hold me, I came away a bit disappointed. I had been expecting to like the book more than I did. I somehow had missed all the hype about this when it came out, but am glad I did, because had I known the tale was being billed as Dickensian or lik An orphan missing his left hand, mysteries, scoundrels, grave robbers and honor amongst thieves and a multitude of plots It is a well-written, fast-plotted, thoroughly enjoyable read that holds up very well to these hefty comparisons.

I was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked this book. Set in New England in the late s, Ren is a 12 year old boy who was left in an orphanage when he was an infant and is missing his left hand. One day a man named Benjamin Nab comes to claim him telling a wild tale about how Ren is his long, lost brother.

The friars have no idea if the story is true, but they don't mind getting rid of one more orphan - so Ren is out the door with Benjamin Nab. Benjamin and his partner Tom are pretty much I was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked this book. Benjamin and his partner Tom are pretty much grifters and will do anything for a buck. They feel a boy without a hand will serve them nicely as they swindle people out of money.

They get into lots of scrapes, but the story of how Ren finds out who he is and where he came from is the best part. The author does a great job of putting it all together. Thank you Goodreads for the copy of this book. Jul 24, Steven Walle rated it it was amazing. The Good Thief was an excellent read. In it a boy of just a few weeks of age was brought to an orphanage called ST. Here he grew up being badly abused by the Father and dreaming of the day he would be adopted.

This young man was deformed, however. His Mother had cut his hand off so it made it almost impossible for him to be adopted. Finally he was adopted and lived a crazy dangerous life style as a thief and grave robber. I will not tell the ending but it was amazing. I recommend all The Good Thief was an excellent read.

I recommend all read this very well written book. It is quite a page turner. Enjoy and Be Blessed. It smells of boiled fish, and the orphaned boys who live there are lice ridden and perpetually hungry. Ren was left on the grounds there as a wee baby, found wrapped in a blanket and missing his left hand.

My compliments to the author for this bit of fun. Sands, the landlady, is pure gold. She speaks only in shouts, and one of her nostrils is conspicuously larger than the other. She has a soft heart, but will not hesitate to take her broom to any tenant who dares transgress and thrash him around the head and shoulders with it.

There is a roof-dwelling dwarf who has a predilection for reading Shakespeare and crafting tiny toys. What did not work for me was the dialogue of Mr. McGinty, owner of the mousetrap factory. Good story, and yes, we find out how Ren lost his hand.

The Good Thief by Hannah Tinti (3 star ratings)

Aug 22, Maren rated it really liked it. This is a book that was almost oversold by the incredible praise on the cover. However, I found that the characters and plot were compelling and she merits some of the comparison. The book feels Dickensian with it's one-handed, orphan hero, Ren who is whisked away from the monastic orphanage into a life of grave-robbing and thievery all while attempting to do This is a book that was almost oversold by the incredible praise on the cover.

The book feels Dickensian with it's one-handed, orphan hero, Ren who is whisked away from the monastic orphanage into a life of grave-robbing and thievery all while attempting to do the moral thing and discover more about his obscure origins. Children's novels about orphans with uncertain parentage are not unusual but this one is a cut above the rest with well-drawn characters, atmospheric language, and a willingness to embrace interesting ethical questions. The beginning of the story while Ren is living at the Catholic orphanage may seem slow-paced but it sets up his moral crises to come.

It is also allows her to make some nice touches like the reference to St. Anthony, patron of lost things, appropriate both to the boys at the orphanage and to the small items Ren feels compelled to steal. Tinti also sets her story in 19th Century New England. I felt the story could be in any country and so I was a bit disappointed that the American setting never really entered into the tale in a more specific way.

The characters, a thief, a drunken former schoolmaster, a murderer for hire, a dwarf, the unhappy proprietress of a boarding house with a propensity for beating people with brooms, the unlucky twins and unfortunate girls forced to work in a mousetrap factory are colorful and compelling. But it is the complicated Ren and his attempts to be good who draws the reader and makes it such a satisfying read. I also respect Tinti for allowing her characters to discover unpleasant truths. The story was left somewhat open-ended so I suspect that if Ren is successful there will be more books about his adventures.

This was a random pick from the library because the cover caught my eye. I'm glad it did — Hannah Tinti's debut novel is very readable, and superior to most YA fiction, but part of its problem is that the author couldn't seem to quite decide whether this was YA or not. You will see a lot of reviewers comparing it to Dickens and Robert Louis Stevenson, mainly because it's about a hard-luck orphan missing a hand for as long as he can remember who embarks upon a fantastic if rather dark and creep This was a random pick from the library because the cover caught my eye.

You will see a lot of reviewers comparing it to Dickens and Robert Louis Stevenson, mainly because it's about a hard-luck orphan missing a hand for as long as he can remember who embarks upon a fantastic if rather dark and creepy adventure. But other than those superficial similarities, I hardly think Tinti's prose resembles either Dickens or Stevenson.

There are occasional literary flourishes and some cleverness, and an awful lot of imagination, but the depth isn't quite there to make this an American classic. The addition of mad doctors doing bad things with corpses and naked dwarves coming down chimneys gets added comparisons to Stephen King or Mary Shelley. But again — no, not really either of them in style or tone. Ren's childhood is not quite as hard-luck as Oliver Twist's — the monks of St.

Anthony's are stern but not cruel. The yearning of Ren and his friends for a family to adopt them, and their fear of being impressed into the army the fate of those boys who aren't adopted is an almost-effective tug at the heartstrings. Ren is a far more believable orphan boy than Harry Potter, and not quite as melodramatic as Oliver Twist. A con artist named Benjamin Nab shows up with a fantastic tale, claiming that he is Ren's older brother.

Ren quickly figures out he's not, but goes along with Nab and his partner and learns the arts of lying, thieving, and "fishing. This eventually leads to Ren of course discovering the truth about his parentage. Ren makes a variety of friends, from the hard-of-hearing, eternally-shouting landlady Mrs. Sands to the murderous giant Dolly, and the mousetrap girl known only as "the Harelip.

These sorts of zany characters and a slightly whimsical tone make this an entertaining and imaginative book, but also made me unable to really take it seriously when Tinti tried to shift into dark and creepy mode. Oh, is this the part where shit gets real? Yeah, I didn't like Hook either.

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But, it's still a good read with likable characters you root for by the end. Hannah Tinti is a promising author who kind of reminds me of Laini Taylor , except in Taylor's case, I thought her writing was great while her story fell flat, while Hannah Tinti's story was compelling and never lost me, but her writing was lacking a "wow" factor for me.

Jan 11, Melinda rated it did not like it. I learned nothing from this frivolous stupid story about people I didn't care about and I hate it when the end of a book is sugar-coated, dipped in chocolate, blasted with high-furctose corn syrup and dusted in sparkly confectioners' sugar all before wrapping it up in a fancy, neat little bow. I can't believe this book is being marketed to adults. If it wasn't about grave robbers and drunken binges, it could be marketed as YA fiction No interesting characters, a plot that tried to be fanciful and magical realism fell so flat that I can't wait to get it out of my mind and out of my house.

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Unfortunately, I am hosting the book club meeting for this book Luckily, it wasn't my pick. It also is NOT a good discussion book, because there isn't any hidden meanings or metaphor. All and all, one of the worst books I have read. Elizabeth Gilbert should be embarrassed to have her rapturous words about what a wonder of a book it is on the cover. Anything to get your name in print, eh?

Jan 06, Danaca rated it it was ok. I had read a couple of good reviews about this book but it didn't live up to my expectations. I almost abandoned it when it didn't draw me in during the first chapters. I did complete it and I did become more interested in the story as it went on.

It has an assortment of colorful characters and I was rooting for the main character by the end. May 12, Stacy rated it it was amazing. I really liked this book. I couldn't put it down, I wanted to know what would happen next. A favorite for sure. Sep 22, Gail Harcourt-Brown rated it liked it. Despite all the rave reviews, I found this book to be only so-so.

Hannah Tinti's prose is excellent, and she certainly paints vivid scenes and characters. However, we've seen a good many of these characters before, in other books: All of that might still be fine, if it weren't for Ms. Tinti's overwhelming obsession with the grotesque: It's so pervasive, you begin to dread new characters and scenes, because you know every one of them is going to be defined by some kind of deformity, injury, rot, or the copious flow of blood.

I have no doubt Ms. Tinti has captured the historical details well. By the end, however, I found myself caring much less about the main character and his friends than I should have, which is too bad, because underneath all the grotesqueries were some moving moments and affecting relationships. Maybe in her next book, Ms. Tinti will put more emphasis on those characters and moments and less on painting the darkest, most historically realistic picture possible.

Bought this one at a used book store because I found the cover and description intriguing. Unfortunately, it kind of lost my interest after that. It got a little too caught up in being "quirky," in my opinion, and the plot got a little strange and hard to follow. There were exciting bits of it, but over all I thought it was just okay. Jul 23, Jennifer rated it really liked it Shelves: This Dickensian adventure story of an orphan boy who makes good by teaming up with a pair of grave robbers is a bit bleak in the telling, but more than makes up for it in the happily-ever-after ending which is still realistic.

Colorful characters enliven the 18th century setting and help the small bedraggled hero make his way in a confusing adult world. Accessible prose and a good eye for historical detail made the pages fly! Feb 12, Schuyler rated it it was ok. Another book I was forced to read because of a book club.


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I agree with one reviewer who said that it seems that Tinti couldn't decide whether to make this a young adult or adult novel. It feels more adult than young adult, but doesn't go far enough to shed that young adult audience. It was a fairly dark book, all things considered, but remained light he Another book I was forced to read because of a book club. While in one scene people are mourning for Jesus as He is en route to Golgotha, in the next scene the very same people are throwing garbage at the two thieves. Later, when all three men are crucified, the good thief defends Jesus from Gestas ' insults and asks to be forgiven for his own crimes.

Jesus forgives the good thief. Later when the two men are dying, Mary is mourning at the foot of her Son's cross. She notices that at the foot of the thief's cross is a disheveled old woman, crying for him and offering him water. A soldier pulls the old woman from the cross; she runs into Mary, to whom she says "That one is my boy! In the film King of Kings , the two thieves, along with Barabbas , are awaiting their fates. The two thieves are appalled when Barabbas compares himself to them. They say "We're only thieves! A fraudulent charity name The St. The Penitent thief is named Jobab in the miniseries Jesus of Nazareth.

The thief features also in Christian popular music, as in Christian rock band Third Day 's song "Thief", and the name of the Christian rock band Dizmas. The thief also is the narrator in Sydney Carter 's controversial song "Friday Morning". In the film Ben-Hur , Dismas is first shown as a teenage zealot whose family has been murdered by the Romans and later crucified beside Jesus. Dismas, the highwayman provided to the player in the first level of roguelike video game Darkest Dungeon , is named after the penitent thief.

Dismas is featured as an integral part of the storyline of the video game Uncharted 4: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wearing a loincloth and either holding his cross or being crucified; sometimes depicted in Paradise. Eden's locked gates the Thief has opened wide, By putting in the key, "Remember me. The A to Z of the Coptic Church. Cited at "The Repentant Thief Who? Icons and their interpretation. Retrieved 26 April Cited according to https: