Read e-book ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities) book. Happy reading ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF ‘So Much Wasted’: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance (Perverse Modernities) Pocket Guide.


  • The Trial of Mother Goose;
  • Trio em lá menor (Portuguese Edition)!
  • Find a copy in the library.
  • Kristi’s Unique Creations: Book of Encouragement!
  • So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance by Patrick Anderson?

Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page.

So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance

Jack Halberstam Series Editor. Lisa Lowe Series Editor.

In So Much Wasted , Patrick Anderson analyzes self-starvation as a significant mode of staging political arguments across the institutional domains of the clinic, the gallery, and the prison. Homing in on those who starve themselves for various reasons and the cultural and political contexts in which they do so, he examines the diagnostic history of anorexia nervosa, fasts In So Much Wasted , Patrick Anderson analyzes self-starvation as a significant mode of staging political arguments across the institutional domains of the clinic, the gallery, and the prison. Anderson explores what it means for the clinic, the gallery, and the prison when one performs a refusal to consume as a strategy of negation or resistance, and the ways that self-starvation, as a project of refusal aimed, however unconsciously, toward death, produces violence, suffering, disappearance, and loss differently from other practices.

Get this edition

Drawing on the work of Martin Heidegger, Sigmund Freud, Giorgio Agamben, Peggy Phelan, and others, he considers how the subject of self-starvation is refigured in relation to larger institutional and ideological drives, including those of the state. Paperback , pages.


  1. So much wasted : hunger, performance, and the morbidity of resistance in SearchWorks catalog!
  2. Denn dein ist die Schuld: Roman (German Edition).
  3. So Much Wasted | Duke University Press.
  4. What Lurks Within.
  5. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about So Much Wasted , please sign up.

    So much wasted : hunger, performance, and the morbidity of resistance (Book, ) [oxivecakyhub.ga]

    Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Jeff rated it really liked it Sep 24, Tom Buchanan rated it liked it Oct 05, Ned Randolph rated it really liked it Mar 16, Jessie rated it it was ok Oct 04, Micah Medina rated it it was amazing Jan 19, Tom Buchanan rated it it was amazing Nov 18, Gayle Noble rated it really liked it Jun 09, Julia rated it it was amazing Jul 07, Skip to search Skip to main content. Describe the connection issue.

    SearchWorks Catalog Stanford Libraries.

    Duke University Press, Physical description xiv, p. Find it at other libraries via WorldCat Limited preview.

    Freely available

    In So Much Wasted , Patrick Anderson analyzes self-starvation as a significant mode of staging political arguments across the institutional domains of the clinic, the gallery, and the prison. Anderson explores what it means for the clinic, the gallery, and the prison when one performs a refusal to consume as a strategy of negation or resistance, and the ways that self-starvation, as a project of refusal aimed, however unconsciously, toward death, produces violence, suffering, disappearance, and loss differently from other practices.

    Drawing on the work of Martin Heidegger, Sigmund Freud, Giorgio Agamben, Peggy Phelan, and others, he considers how the subject of self-starvation is refigured in relation to larger institutional and ideological drives, including those of the state.