Get e-book The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics) book. Happy reading The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Childrens Plutarch: Tales of the Greeks (Yesterdays Classics) Pocket Guide.

Book V of the Story of the World Series. Through the eyes of Kit and Kat, 5 year-old twins, we catch a glimpse of life in Holland a century ago. We follow them as they go fishing with grandfather, join their father on market day, help their mother around the house, drive the milk cart, and get new skates. The story draws to a close on St. Nicholas Day when St.

Nicholas himself pays them a visit. Share the adventures of Menie and Monnie, 5 year-old twins in an Eskimo village, where the villagers have to provide for all their own needs. Their father, Kesshoo, is a brave fisherman and strong hunter and their mother Koolee is clever in making clothing and shoes out of the skins of the animals which he brings home.

We watch the twins as they spot a polar bear while coasting on their sleds, then join with the villagers in the sharing of the meat and the feasting afterwards. Among the other activities they enjoy are ice fishing, building a snow house, hunting for seals, and traveling by boat to their summering ground where they catch salmon to dry for the winter.

Children are captivated by the humor and playfulness in this community where the winter night lasts for four long months! Engaging introduction to the peoples of the world through the stories of the seven little sisters: Join Taro and Take, 5 year-old Japanese twins, as they greet a new baby brother, play in their garden, and thrill to the sights they see when they ride in rickshaws to the temple to have their new brother blessed.

Yesterday's Classics: Ancient Greece

A rainy day finds them painting pictures with colored sands and harnessing beetles with thread, then preparing for their first day of school. The story concludes with the celebration of their birthday-on different days! For Take and all the other girls in Japan celebrate their birthday on one day with a Feast of Dolls, and Taro and all the boys celebrate on another day with a Feast of Flags. With Irish twins Larry and Eileen, we enjoy a visit to Granny Malone's and puzzle over the letter she has received from her son in America, a letter that sets the wheels in motion for all sorts of adventures.

Along the way the twins encounter gypsies and discover a pig stuck in a bog that brings a change in fortune to their family. While following Larry and Eileen on their adventures, we gain a vivid understanding of the close-knit community life of the Irish countryside, as it existed a century ago. The Seven Sisters Prove their Sisterhood. Sequel to The Seven Sisters Who Live on the Round Ball That Floats in the Air , which is an engaging introduction to the peoples of the world through the stories of the seven little sisters: In this volume the stories of the seven little sisters are continued, with more detail about how they live in their vastly different environments and how they are connected to their sisters around the world.

The Burgess Bird Book for Children. In the context of the story about each bird, we hear about its nesting habits, its feeding preferences, and its interactions with other wildlife. An engaging introduction to birds for young children. Mother Nature unfolds some of her most precious secrets. She tells about amber, about the dragon-fly and its wonderful history, about water-lilies, how the Indian corn grows, what odd doings the Frost Giants engage in, about coral, and starfish, and coal mines, and many other things in which children take delight.

All the animals in Tommy Smith's neighborhood lived in fear of him. Thinking that he would treat them more kindly if he knew more about them, they each agreed to meet him and share their life story. In these conversations Tommy Smith did indeed learn lots of information about the animals: In the course of these encounters with the frog and toad, the rook, the rat, the hare, the snake, the peewit, the mole, the woodpigeon, the squirrel, and the owl, Tommy's heart did soften, and, as the barn owl had predicted, he became a friend to all the animals.

Around the dooryard nest all sorts of birds, including flickers, robins, sparrows, wrens, swifts, and blackbirds. These stories convey some of the drama that arises in the garden as birds go about the business of building nests and raising young. The author's cat Silvertip figures in a number of the narratives as do a number of other mammals and insects. Invites children to 'see how many tiny neighbors you have around you, and how much you can learn about them. Among the Forest People.

A charming series of nature stories for young children, including tales of red squirrels, great horned owls, rattlesnakes, and bats. No one can read these realistic conversations of the little creatures of the wood without being most tenderly drawn toward them.

Within the context of each story children learn many entertaining facts about the lives and habits of these little people of the forest. Among the Pond People. These stories are full of humor, yet cleverly convey information about the frogs, minnows, and other pond residents and often suggest a moral in a delicate manner which no child could resist. School of the Woods. Through vivid depictions of a dozen family groupings, the author demonstrates that mother animals and birds often train their young in order to supplement their natural instincts.

The minecraft life of Alex and Steve /THE MOVIE

The deer and her fawns, the black bear and her cubs, the fishhawk and her nestlings, the keen-eyed heron, the stupid porcupine, and the mighty moose are some of the animals whose teachings are described in this book. Secrets of the Woods. Vivid sketches of the wood-mouse, otter, kingfisher, red squirrel, partridge, deer, and other wood folk. Share the excitement of three little children as they discover how beans grow from seeds, then start to wonder how other plants get their start, which leads them to watch closely for new life springing up all around them.

Numerous black and white drawings enliven the text. Squirrels and Other Fur-Bearers. Delightful sketches of small mammals familiar to country dwellers including the squirrel, chipmunk, woodchuck, rabbit, muskrat, skunk, fox, weasel, mink, raccoon, porcupine, opossum, and mouse.


  • The Baldwin Project: Tales of the Greeks: The Children's Plutarch by F. J. Gould.
  • La secuoya (Spanish Edition);
  • Blood, Sweat and Demon Tears (The Grateful Undead series Book 3).

Wild Life in Woods and Field. First volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces the youthful reader to the variety of animal and plant life that three children observe on their way to school through fields and woods. The goal of the series is to inspire children to become keen observers of wildlife and to heighten their curiosity about their natural surroundings. Eight color illustrations and numerous black and white drawings complement the text.

By Pond and River. Second volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces children to the variety of plant and animal life around ponds and rivers. Through life stories of frogs, dragon-flies, fish, water-bugs, water birds, otters, and voles, children's interest in water creatures is awakened. An exhibit of water plants at a flower show concludes the volume. Seven color illustrations and numerous black and white drawings complement the text. Birds of the Air. Fourth volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces the youthful reader to bird life, beginning with birds of home and garden and ending with water birds and birds of prey.

Children learn how to identify birds, why birds sing songs, how they build nests, lay eggs, and raise their young, where they sleep, and how they feed in summer, migrate in autumn, and survive the winter. The Natural History Story Book. Lively collection of stories of some of the most interesting animals in the world, as man encountered them in the nineteenth century. Many details of animal life are given along with the roles the animals played in the lives of the people in their native habitats.

Packed with thrilling exploits that will delight lovers of adventure, this book is not for the faint of heart. The Burgess Animal Book for Children. Encouraging the animals to notice the differences between them and to offer their observa-tions of animal behavior, Old Mother Nature helps them all gain a greater understanding of the mammals of North America.

Starting with the animals close to home, the school moves in ever-widening circles to encompass the animals of the far west and the extreme north, as well. A fine introduction to mammals for students in the primary grades. Wild Animals I Have Known. A stirring account of the lives of eight wild animals, including Lobo, the king of Currumpaw; Silverspot, the story of a crow; Raggylug, the story of a cottontail rabbit; Bingo, the story of a dog; the Springfield fox; the pacing mustang; Wully, the story of a yaller dog; and Redruff, the story of the Don valley partridge.

Engaging stories of seven more animals, including Coaly-Bay, the outlaw horse; Foam, the razor-backed hog; Way-atcha, the raccoon of Kilder Creek; Billy, the dog that made good; Atalpha, the winged brownie; the wild geese of Wyndygoul; and Jinny, the mischievous monkey. With over sketches by the author. Among the Farmyard People. Introduces young children to the animals of the farmyard through a series of engaging stories about the sheep, chickens, cows, and horses that live there.

With new animals arriving regularly, we make the acquaintance also of a pig and a peacock, as well as some ducks and guinea fowls. Each story closes with a gentle moral, inspiring children to right behavior. Among the Meadow People. Delightful stories of field life for young children, relating incidents in the lives of birds, insects, and other small creatures who make the meadow their home. Each chapter features the story of one animal in its daily activities and interactions with the other animals inhabiting the meadow.

Among the Night People. Stories of animals of the night for young children, relating the activities of raccoons, skunks, moths, foxes, fireflies, and weasels. Since we can't understand animal language, the author depicts the animals talking to each other in English, but she does it so skillfully that you can imagine that they are using their own ways of communicating through voice and gesture.

Parables for children inspired by nature. This collection includes all 29 stories from the first, second, third, and fourth series, originally published in separate volumes. A Little Brother to the Bear. Mooweesuk the Coon is called the bear's little brother by both Indians and naturalists, because of the many ways in which he resembles the 'big prowler in the black coat.

An attractive introduction to the curious structure, habits, and activities of bees, in which readers learn how the bees' wondrous body parts equip them to gather nectar and pollen, construct the hive, and nurture the young, and how the different kinds of bees interact in the life of the hive.

Over one hundred pen drawings by the author illustrate the features described in the text. Engaging account of why seeds travel and how they do it. Learn how some seeds fly, others float, and still others are shot away. Then find out two ways in which animals play a role in seed dispersal. Numerous black and white illustrations complement the text. Plant Life in Field and Garden.

Third volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces children to the wonders of plant life through examination of a variety of plants, including the cabbage, the turnip, the cucumber, and the rose. In addition to becoming familiar with the structure of plants, the reader discovers how seeds grow, how insects help, and how plants defend themselves. Through this book children are inspired to become keen observers of plant life as they collect specimens and study plants in their natural habitats.


  • Yesterday's Classics:.
  • Front Matter!
  • Dangerous Seduction (a Brian Bianco novel Book 7)!
  • !
  • ;
  • Table of Contents!
  • THE ADVENTURES OF MANXY THE TAILESS CAT (FIRST EDITON Book 1).

Fifth volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces children to trees and shrubs, encouraging them to ponder all the ways in which trees are useful to us. They learn how a tree starts and how it continues to grow year after year. They study an oak tree in detail, along with the animal life it supports, then contrast it with cone-bearing trees and trees of hedgerow, garden, and park.

Sixth volume in the Eyes and No Eyes series, introduces children to insect life by collecting a variety of specimens and then examining them in detail, identifying their parts and observing their life cycles. Includes caterpillars, familiar moths and butterflies, harmful and useful beetles, wasps and bees, flies, ants, and crickets and grasshoppers. A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys. Delightful retelling of six Greek myths to a crowd of energetic youngsters by a master storyteller. The thrilling story of one of the most remarkable figures in history. Recounts how Alexander ascended the Macedonian throne at the age of 20, overthrew his rival claimants, and then began preparations for the expedition against Persia.

After defeating Darius, he proceeded to Egypt where he founded Alexandria, then turned back into Asia, where he subdued the most powerful nations, and in a span of eleven years conquered almost all of the known world. But, as his fortunes rose, his character deteriorated, and he died unexpectedly at the age of The Story of Greece. Stories from the history of ancient Greece beginning with mythical and legendary stories of gods and heroes and ending with the conquests of Alexander the Great.

Gives short accounts of battles and sieges, and of the men who made Greece a great nation. The Story of the Greeks. Elementary history of Greece, made up principally of stories about persons, giving at the same time a clear idea of the most important events in the ancient world and calculated to enforce the lessons of perseverance, courage, patriotism, and virtue that are taught by the noble lives described.

Beginning with the legends of Jason, Theseus, and events surrounding the Trojan War, the narrative moves on to present the contrasting city-states of Sparta and Athens, the war against Persia, their conflicts with each other, the feats of Alexander the Great, and annexation by Rome. This book paves the way to an enjoyable reading of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, by presenting the legends about the causes of the Trojan War woven into a continuous narrative, ending where the story of the Iliad begins. The youthful Odysseus is the hero, as he journeys to visit his grandfather Autolycus, then Nestor and Menelaus, hearing the old stories as he goes.

Tales of the Greeks. Twenty-one stories of the ancient Greeks adapted for the younger reader from the admirable biographies of Plutarch. Ideal introduction to the characters that figured prominently in the history of ancient Greece. Includes three black and white illustrations by Walter Crane. One of the best introductions to Greek mythology for children. Includes the stories of all the prominent gods and heroes, woven together into a continuous narrative, ending with a full treatment of the twelve labors of Hercules.

Engaging account of the life of children in ancient Sparta, where patriotism, heroism, and strength in battle are the highest ideals. We discover how at age seven boys leave home to live in company with 15 others, training to be Spartan soldiers through rigorous physical and mental exercises. In addition to wrestling, running, and throwing the discus, we watch them foraging for their food, gathering reeds for their bedding, singing patriotic songs, and eating at mess with their elders. Emphasis is on the true nobility and rugged simplicity of the Spartan character.

Men of Old Greece. A vivid picture of life in ancient Greece through the stories of four very different men. The reader hears how Leonidas, raised under the strict system of Sparta, becomes king and leads his countrymen at the battle of Thermopylae, and how Themistocles, in prompting the Athenians to build boats and escape to Salamis, guides the Greeks to victory against the Persians. When Athens lay in ruins, the sculptor Phidias is instrumental in its rebuilding.

It becomes such a vibrant city that the philosopher Socrates, when arrested on a trumped-up charge, prefers to die, rather than to live anywhere other than Athens. Plutarch's Lives for Boys and Girls. Selected lives from Plutarch admirably retold by W. Introductory material by the reteller sets each life in its historical context.

A lively retelling of 35 favorite Greek myths, ranging from the short stories of Phaeton, Arachne and Bellerophon to the longer tales of Jason and his quest for the Golden Fleece, the twelve labors of Hercules, and Theseus and the Minotaur. Provides excellent material for cultivating the child's imagination and quickening his moral sense. Includes a complete guide to the pronunciation and explanation of unfamiliar names.

Stories from the Greek Tragedians. Thirteen strong, interesting tales from Greek tragedy, admirably retold by Alfred J. Church and retaining remarkably well the spirit of the originals. Stories from Plato and Other Classic Writers. Twenty-seven stories adapted for young children from selections of works of classic writers of the ancient world.

The stories were chosen by the author for their inspirational value, either 'because they contained fine moral points, or else because they were poetic statements of natural phenomena which might enhance the study of natural science. Stories of Old Greece. Sixteen Greek myths, especially selected and carefully adapted for young listeners.

Includes the stories of Arachne, Pandora, Clytie, Pandora, and a dozen other short myths. While the outlines of the stories come, for the most part, from the Roman poet Ovid, additional details are included to enhance their appeal to children. The story of Nearchus, who comes as a page to the court of King Philip of Macedon, where he befriends the young Alexander the Great.

In company with other boys, Nearchus and Alexander divide their time between lessons, and gymnastic and military drill. We follow them on an all-night tramp under one instructor and share their joy when their new tutor, Aristotle, arrives. The story revolves around the differing gifts of the boys and predictions about what fortune holds in store for each of them. Attractively illustrated by Willy Pogany.

Presents the chief geographical features of Greece and historical sketches of the life of the people at four stages of their development: Emphasizes Greece's growth to a land of great beauty. Shows Alexander's influence in spreading Hellenistic culture through Egypt and Asia. Famous Men of Greece. Attractive biographical sketches of thirty-five of the most prominent characters in the history of ancient Greece, from legendary times to its fall in B.

Each story is told in a clear, simple manner, and is well calculated to awaken and stimulate the youthful imagination. The Odyssey for Boys and Girls. Lively retelling of Homer's Odyssey, telling of the wanderings of Ulysses and his adventures with the giant Cyclops and the enchantress Circe as he makes his way home to his beloved Ithaca. There, after slaying the suitors who have been wooing his wife Penelope, he is reunited with his family after twenty long years. The Iliad for Boys and Girls. Vigorous retelling of Homer's Iliad, relating the incidents of the great siege of Troy, from the quarrel of the chiefs to the ransoming of Hector's body.

Our Young Folks' Plutarch. Fifty retellings from Plutarch's Lives skillfully adapted for children. Includes the conquests of Alexander the Great, how Demosthenes became an orator, the conspiracy against Caesar, the life of Lycurgus the law-giver of Sparta, the exploits of Pyrrhus and others. A child's first book of Greek tales containing many of the shorter myths retold with exceptional literary skill. Relates the stories of Prometheus, who brought to earth the bright-eyed fire treasured by the gods; of Orpheus, best of harpers; of the cunning Daedalus; the ambitious Phaethon; Apollo and Diana, and other gods and heroes of the olden time.

Vivid portrayal of the civic and home life of children in Athens during the reign of Pericles, when the art and architecture of ancient Greece were at their height. Through the eyes of Duris, son of the architect Phorion, and Hiero, son of the sculptor Hermippos, we experience the Greek culture of the times as we accompany them on their journey from home to market-place, wonder at the Acropolis, visit schools and studios, observe festivals, and participate in the Olympic games.

Peeps at Many Lands: Through the eyes of a traveler to ancient Greece, we see how, by reason of geography, Greece became a land of city states. After examining several different city states and their land and naval forces, we watch all Greece come together for the Olympic games. Turning our attention to Athens, we marvel at the theatre, architecture, and sculpture of the age of Pericles.

Stories of the Ancient Greeks. Delightful collection of both mythological and historical stories of the ancient Greeks, in language simple enough for younger listeners, yet appealing to all ages. Provides an excellent introduction to ancient Greece, beginning with 32 of the best-known myths, and then continuing with 32 short stories of the historical era, arranged in chronological order.

An extensive pronunciation guide is included. Delightful retelling in simple language of the stories of the old Greek mythological heroes, and their encounters with Jupiter and the other Olympians. While each story can be read independently, they can also be read as a continuous narrative, with one story leading to the next. A pronunciation guide and numerous illustrations accompany the text. During their sojourn there they learn much about Spartan customs and hear stories from Spartan history, which, when added to their personal experience of Athenian customs and stories of Athenian history, give a full picture of life in ancient Greece as children experienced it in the 5th century B.

Stories of the East from Herodotus. Engaging narrative of stories from the History of Herodotus, recounting the tale of Croesus and the Fall of Sardis, chronicling the careers of Cyrus and Cambyses, and, finally, documenting Darius's rise to power. The author's The Story of the Persian War continues the account.

Includes numerous black and white illustrations from ancient frescoes and sculptures. The Story of the Persian War. Stirring account of the Greeks' encounters with the Persians in the 5th century B. Illustrations from sculptures and vases accompany the text. Stories of the heroes of ancient Greece, told in fine poetic prose. By preserving the Greek spirit in the retelling of these myths, Kingsley gives us plain strength and seriousness, courage, steadfastness, and beauty. Dozens of attractive illustrations by T. Robinson enliven the text.

Eighteen fables from the Jatakas of India, skillfully retold and attractively illustrated. Thirty-four animal fables ably retold from the Panchatantra of India. Originally written in Sanskrit, tradition attributes the fables to Bidpai, an Indian sage, who, as legend has it, wrote them to instruct the king in moral wisdom.

The king was delighted with the gentle wisdom and humor of the fables, which continue to be enjoyed by children to this day. Attractive black and white illustrations complement the text. The Book of Fables and Folk Stories. A choice collection of old folk tales and fables, attractively arranged and illustrated. Between each of the longer tales appear several short fables, offering a varied reading experience for the young reader for whom it is intended.

Twenty-one more fables from the Jataka tradition of India, compiled at the request of children captivated by the charm of the stories in Jataka Tales, retold by the same author and illustrated by the same artist. An appealing collection of more than a hundred Indian fables that are delightful as well as short, pithy, and ingenious. Each fable has its separate moral in prose or rhyme; these are often epigrams of the shrewdest kind, full of wit and subtlety. Most of these fables are likely to be new to the majority of readers.

In the characters of animals the same rules are observed as in Western fables. As the symbol of strength, the lion or, in one or two instances, the tiger is king, the fox is the symbol of cunning, the bear of inert power, the wolf of ferocity, the owl of assumed wisdom, and so forth. The Story of Rome. A vivid account of the story of Rome from the earliest times to the death of Augustus, retold for children, chronicling the birth of a city and its growth through storm and struggle to become a great world empire. Gives short accounts of battles and campaigns, and of the men who expanded the borders of the Roman empire to include all lands bordering the Mediterranean Sea.

Famous Men of Rome. Attractive biographical sketches of twenty-eight of the most prominent characters in the history of ancient Rome, from its founding to its fall. Includes most of the best known characters from the kingdom and republic of Rome, as well as the most prominent personages from the imperial age. Story of the early days of Rome, beginning with the flight of Aeneas from Troy and his landing in Latium, continuing with the rivalry of Romulus and Remus, and culminating in the founding of Rome.

A stirring account of one of the most controversial figures in history, who, driven by ambition, rose to power in ancient Rome. Relates how Caesar, one of the three greatest generals in the ancient world, used his many victories on the battlefield to build his power base in Rome, then how he increased his popularity and won over many of his rivals through diplomacy, before being assassinated in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March in 44 B. Stories from Ancient Rome. Stories of the early days of Rome, from the time of the kings through the establishment of the republic and its struggles with other peoples on the Italian peninsula, and concluding with the wars with Carthage.

The Aeneid for Boys and Girls. Relates in vigorous prose the tale of Aeneas, the legendary ancestor of Romulus, who escaped from the burning city of Troy and wandered the Mediterranean for years before settling in Italy. Patterned after the Iliad and the Odyssey, the Aeneid was composed as an epic poem by Virgil, to glorify the imperial city of Rome. Tales of early Roman history drawn from the greatest of Roman historians, and admirably retold by Alfred J.

Features stories of the founding of Rome, the expulsion of kings, and the early days of the republic. Through the story of Marcus and his growth to manhood in the closing days of the Roman Republic, we discover much about life and customs in ancient Rome. We accompany Marcus as he learns his lessons in school, joins his father on a trip to the Senate, pays a visit to his father's farm, and watches the triumph of a victorious general. The crowning moment comes when Marcus assumes the toga, the mark of a Roman citizen. The Story of the Romans. Elementary history of Rome, presenting short stories of the great heroes, mythical and historical, from Aeneas and the founding of Rome to the fall of the western empire.

Around the famous characters of Rome are graphically grouped the great events with which their names will forever stand connected. Vivid descriptions bring to life the events narrated, making history attractive to the young, and awakening their enthusiasm for further reading and study. Presents the geography of Italy and the life of Rome at three different periods of her growth: Relates how Rome in her early years established herself in Italy, then engaged in conflict with Carthage, her most powerful neighbor and enemy, and finally extended her power all around the Mediterranean, giving to the world peace, law and order, and making unconsciously a highway both for Greek culture and for Christianity to spread to the West.

An account of the life of the famous Carthaginian general who acquired distinction as a warrior by his desperate contests with the Romans. This lively treatment of the Punic Wars graphically depicts Hannibal's crossing of the Alps with his elephants, the battles he waged in Italy, his eventual defeat, and the ultimate destruction of Carthage. Tales of the Romans. Collection of stories of ancient Romans skillfully adapted from Plutarch's Lives, with emphasis placed on the characters of the individuals portrayed. Excellent as an introduction to the biographies of Plutarch.

Stories from the History of Rome. Stories from the history of Rome for the youngest children, selected with a view to illustrating the two sentiments most characteristic of Roman life: An introduction to the ancient city of Rome, its early history, and how its geographical position helped it become the seat of the Roman Empire. Traveling to the city in A. And finally we learn that the secret to Rome's greatness is discipline, inculcated in her citizens by military training and held up as an ideal in both home and civic life. The Burning of Rome. Vivid story of Rome in the days of Nero, beginning with the burning of the city, seemingly ordered by Nero himself.

The narrative revolves around a set of characters who suffer acutely in the cruel persecutions of the Christians, set in motion by Nero after the fire to deflect blame for the conflagration from himself and fasten it on the Christians. Through the story of Hanno, a boy of Carthage, we gain insight into the Carthaginians, a nation of sea-farers and traders, who amassed so much wealth and power that they became Rome's arch enemy. We follow Hanno on a voyage to the Tin Islands and the Baltic, then on a series of adventures at home in Carthage, and finally his exploits with Hannibal in Spain and Italy.

For the Children's Hour. A choice collection of stories for the preschool child, carefully selected, adapted, and arranged by two veteran kindergarten teachers. Includes nature stories, holiday stories, fairy tales and fables, as well as stories of home life. Emphasis is placed on fanciful tales for their value in the training of the imagination and on cumulative tales for developing a child's sense of humor and appealing to his instinctive love of rhyme and jingle. Seventeen stories ideally suited for kindergarten children who take great interest in lively stories about familiar things, especially those that include rhyme and repetition as these stories do.

Within each story is a subtle moral, pleasing to children and not at all obtrusive. Twenty more delightful stories for kindergarten children about the commonplace things they care about most, with enough rhyme and repetition to keep them begging for more. Most of the stories in this book revolve around animals of the barnyard, with a sprinkling of stories of everyday doings. Two Christmas stories conclude the volume. This delightful book for young listeners awakens children's interest in the world around them through the story of Joe-Boy and how he grew from a baby in a gipsy camp to become an active member of society.

We hear first about how Joy-Boy's house is built and furnished, and how his clothes are made. Then we watch Joe-Boy's circle broaden to include the pets he cares for, the wild animals he observes, and the friends he makes. Includes an especially fine group of nature stories. An ideal introduction to a longer narrative for children of kindergarten age. A full collection of stories and rhymes for the youngest listeners. In addition to the usual fairy tales, folk tales, and fables, there are numerous stories about animals, tales of everyday doings, and stories of the seasons.

INTRODUCTION

The material is conveniently arranged in groups, with several stories and rhymes for each holiday and season throughout the year. Twenty-one stories of the everyday doings of Little John around the farm: Twenty-one more stories about Little John working and playing on the farm, engaged in such activities as tending animals, growing corn, and chopping wood, or fishing, skating, and sledding. Second volume in a series of a stories created by a father to induce a certain little boy to go to sleep. For nearly three years his one listener heard them repeated many times, and his interest never flagged.

As the farm stories slowly grew in number, eventually to fill two volumes, they entirely displaced the other stories, and that farm became as real in the mind of his listener as it was in fact when little John was driving the cows or planting the corn in the early part of the nineteenth century. Thirteen stories of Little David who befriends the men building a house next door and participates in the action from the digging of the foundation to the laying of the shingles.

One of the earliest collections of fairy tales from different countries, first published in Carefully selected and rendered anew in language close to the oral tradition. Includes old English tales, such as Jack the Giant-killer and Tom Thumb, as well as German stories from Grimm, and French tales of Perrault and Madame d'Aulnoy, and many other delightful and time-honored fairy tales.

Numerous black and white illustrations by Louis Rhead complement the text. The Blue Fairy Book. A favorite collection of the best-known fairy tales, drawn from the folklore of many nations. It is the first and one of the best volumes in the series of colored fairy books produced by Andrew Lang at the turn of the twentieth century.

Like the other volumes in the series, it includes engaging black and white illustrations that enliven the text. The King of the Golden River. A fairy tale of what happened to two men who tried to get rich in evil ways and of how the fortune they sought came to their younger brother, whose kind and loving heart prompted him to right action. Widely regarded as a masterpiece of 19th century stories for children. Includes four black and white illustrations by Maria L. The King of Ireland's Son.

A romance of unusual beauty and simplicity, having all the traditional elements of the folk tale and all its magic and wonder. In vigorous and rhythmic prose, the author recounts the adventurous wooing of Fedelma, the enchanter's daughter, by the King of Ireland's son, and relates the many strange adventures they had on their journey home, weaving many short tales from the Gaelic tradition into the fabric of the narrative.

A book of uncommon beauty in form and content, with illustrations and decorations in black and white by Willy Pogany.

A collection of fifteen original stories ideally suited for young children. Each of the stories features a light-filled being whose radiance illumines the path for those who follow. Meant to be suggestive to the parent or teacher of the types of stories that can be told to children to inspire them to grow in goodness. A delightful collection of folk tales from West Africa including 18 Anansi tales, as well as 17 others.

Includes the story of how the tales came to be called Anansi tales. In the olden days all the stories which men told were stories of Nyankupon, the chief of the gods. Spider wanted the stories to be about him. Nyankupon agreed, on one condition, namely that he bring him three things: How Anansi contrived to achieve all these tasks is related in the opening story. A Child's Book of Stories. A choice collection of favorite fairy tales, to delight children of all ages. The 86 stories selected for this collection include folk tales from England, Norway, and India, as well as the best fairy tales from Grimm, Andersen, and Perrault.

The volume also contains a handful of fables from Aesop and several tales from the Arabian Nights. The authors read thousands of fairy tales to locate the best of the less familiar tales to include in this volume. Numerous black and white illustrations accompany the text. While drawing on German, English, and Scandinavian folk literature for many of his characters and plots, Pyle reworks the material in an imaginative way, crafting the tales in his own inimitable style.

World History

Equally engaging are the numerous woodcuts that accompany the stories and enliven the narrative. Seven fairy tales, set in an interesting framework in which are related the adventures of the little girl Snowflower and her magical chair at the court of King Winwealth. When Snow-flower, from her nook in the kitchen, said, "Chair of my grandmother, take me to the highest banquet hall," "instantly the chair marched in a grave and courtly fashion out of the kitchen, up the grand staircase, and into the highest hall. East o' the Sun and West o' the Moon. Twenty-two Norwegian folk tales, especially selected and carefully adapted for young readers.

A collection of stories that has delighted children for generations. Fanciful explanations, that delight both young and old, of how some curious things came to be, including stories of how the elephant got his trunk, how the camel got his hump, and how the alphabet was invented. A child's history of England from earliest legendary times delightfully retold. Beginning with the stories of Albion and Brutus, it relates all the interesting legends and hero tales in which the history of England abounds through the end of the reign of Queen Victoria.

In the Days of Alfred the Great. In the Days of William the Conqueror. Story of the life of William the Conqueror, telling of his boyhood in Normandy, beset by dangers, of his knighting by the King of France and of the after-deeds which made him famous, including the conquest of England. In the Days of Queen Elizabeth. Story of the life of Queen Elizabeth, the famous English sovereign who guided the ship of state with consummate skill through the troubled waters of the latter half of the sixteenth century.

Includes stories of English voyages of exploration and the defeat of the Spanish armada. In the Days of Queen Victoria. Story of the life of Queen Victoria, a well-beloved woman who became queen at eighteen and for nearly 64 years wore the crown of Great Britain. Relates her training for the monarchy and the exemplary way she executed her duties, while managing a household of nine children. A child's history of Scotland, from legendary days through the time when the kingdoms of Scotland and England were joined together.

Relates in vigorous prose the thrilling exploits of the heroes and heroines who defended Scotland from its English invaders. Gentle stories of saints who lived their lives of service in the British Isles during the Middle Ages. Includes tales of St. Margaret of Scotland, and others. Vivid and picturesque account of the principal events in the building of the British Empire. Traces the development of the British colonies from days of discovery and exploration through settlement and establishment of government. Includes stories of the five chief portions of the Empire: The Children of the New Forest.

An engaging adventure story set in England during the time of the Civil War when King Charles was deposed and the Roundheads were vying with the Cavaliers. The central characters are the four children of staunch Royalist Colonel Beverley killed in battle while fighting for King Charles. Through the efforts of aged forester Jacob Armitage, the children escape the burning of their ancestral home and take up residence with him in his cottage in the New Forest.

The pitfall they build to trap cattle catches more than they bargain for, leading to one adventure after another. Against all odds they deftly maneuver through the treacherous landscape of the times, eventually recovering their family estate. First published in , these simple retellings of the plots of Shakespeare's plays have delighted generations of children, while serving as an excellent introduction to the dramas of our greatest playwright.

Shakespeare's own language is used as much as possible to accustom children to the English of the Elizabethan age and so make easier their transition to the reading of the plays themselves. Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare. Twenty stories from Shakespeare retold in lively prose. The author makes the complex language of Shakespeare's greatest plays accessible to young children by relating the stories that form the core of the plays. Her graceful, vivid retellings are the perfect introduction to Shakespeare's works. Hurlbut's Story of the Bible. A book which stands in such honor as the Bible should be known by all.

And the time when one can most readily obtain a familiarity with the Bible is in early life. Those who in childhood learn the Story of the Bible are fortunate, for they will never forget it. In this unabridged and unedited edition you will find all the principal stories of the Bible, each one complete in itself, while together combining to form a continuous narrative.

With stories from both the Old Testament and the New Testament, there is ample material for a full year of reading. With this sympathy as a basis, one could better build up conceptions of social justice, civic evolution, and international relations. I could think of no finer material for this purpose than the admirable biographies of Plutarch; though the national history, or the history of Western Europe generally, would doubtless serve the same end.

Western history, however, derives its traditions from Greece and Rome, and it seemed to me an advantage to use a work which not only furnished simple instruction in the meaning of politics, but also held rank as a literary classic. My version is intended for children aged about ten to fourteen, after which period they should be encouraged to go direct to the wise, manly, and entertaining pages of Plutarch himself.

The ethical index is framed for the use of teachers who wish for examples to illustrate the moral lessons [xii] which are now becoming a recognized part of the regular school education. The spirit of my selection from Plutarch's ample store is aptly represented in the beautiful drawings by Mr.

The wealth of his parents enabled him to enjoy a thorough education at Athens, particularly in philosophy. After making various journeys, he lived for a long time in Rome, where he lectured upon philosophy and associated with people of distinction, and took an important part in the education of the future Emperor Hadrian. It was about A. In addition to his most famous work, the Parallel Lives , known familiarly as Plutarch's Lives , he was the author of some eighty-three writings of various kinds. Historically they have supplied many deficiencies in knowledge of the times and persons treated in his great work.

The Hardy Men of Sparta. The Wise Man of Athens. The Savior of Athens. The Admiral of the Fleet. The Man with Many Faces. The Man Who Saved Sicily. A Servant of the City. Golden Shoes and Two Crowns. The Last of the Greeks. Search This Site Only. Tales of the Greeks: Tales of the Greeks. Twenty-one stories of the ancient Greeks adapted for the younger reader from the admirable biographies of Plutarch.

Ideal introduction to the characters that figured prominently in the history of ancient Greece.