Get PDF Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition) book. Happy reading Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Le ravissement de Marguerite Duras (LOeuvre et la Psyché) (French Edition) Pocket Guide.

Still, it's not all gloom and Beckett and Sartre because Duras, in this 1st version of her affair has given us, conventionally-prosed, something wonderfully reminiscent of Carson McCullers. The portrait of colonial Indochina beginning Part II is breathtaking. Her description of Saigon is a compelling moment. Duras has always had ties to motion pictures. Throughout The Sea Wall she scatters episodes of her characters relating to movies, how they manage to find hope in the lives portrayed on the screen, and how some characters are denied that hope.

Duras writes marvelously about film. It's just one of the examples showing how The Sea Wall is finely crafted. The magic is there.

I think this is fairly accomplished fiction. I've never read Duras before, though I really like the movie "The Lover," which I've seen about a billion times, which is based on her novel I haven't read that one yet, but it's on my TBR pile. Though it's got a very French sensibility bleak, nihilistic and materialistic I actually really liked The Sea Wall, which is set in s French Indochina. I thought the imagery was fantastic, and the characterizations fascinating. It flung me deeply into that time period and place, and the character I've never read Duras before, though I really like the movie "The Lover," which I've seen about a billion times, which is based on her novel I haven't read that one yet, but it's on my TBR pile.

It flung me deeply into that time period and place, and the characters weren't always likeable. However, the book haunts me, and I just can't forget it. It was all amazing to live with the events of this nice piece of art.

Steeped in a sense of frustrated longing, of impossible desire - for love, for escape, for salvation; of loneliness, awakening sexuality, futility, hope, cruelty and lust - this book comes on like a slow fever and doesn't break its hold on you until the final words. I have found it to be unforgettable. What could be more tragic and useless as building a "sea wall" or a beautiful young woman throwing her life away This is essentially the same sad story as The Lover but written times better.

I read this twice; the second time I liked it even more. Duras captures how being isolated and poor feels, and the isolation and poverty of a colonial family, whose head of household is a widow left to fend for her family in a traditional, patriarchal culture, would be still worse. The family's life is evoked rather than cataloged, so the feelings of loneliness and isolation and being trapped come into the reader through tone and imagery.

This is not a book for people who want comedy, though the I read this twice; the second time I liked it even more. This is not a book for people who want comedy, though there is irony in plenty. Duras writes like no one else. Her voice is simple yet eloquent, ironic. Published August 12th by Pantheon first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about L'Amante anglaise , please sign up. Lists with This Book. I dreamed I was killing her. Recommended to Nate D by: When I killed her, I wasn't dreaming. An abyss yawns at the center of this book. Unutterably massive, pitch black. The words on the pages just trace its edges, shining dull beams that utterly fail to illuminate anything within. After reading so many of Duras' novels, at times they seem like echoes of eachother, a collection of key words that I probably gleaned from M.

Kitchell's excellent surveys of her oeuvre: They're always good, they always offer new facets of her prime considerations, but at t An abyss yawns at the center of this book. They're always good, they always offer new facets of her prime considerations, but at times they risk slurring together into one meta-work where individual features begin to be swallowed up. And then a book like this cuts straight through all of that, laying waste to every expectation I'd settled into.

It's all here, that intensity, that sense of brushing against the void, that particular attention to how the story is narrated, to how it exists as a sequence of spoken sentences and ideas unstoppably building upon themselves. This is good as The Ravishing of Lol Stein , my prior favorite, as good as anything Duras ever wrote, likely. View all 6 comments.

Access Check

On peut ainsi discerner quatre attitudes et quatre types de personnages: I found the form more compelling than the content, and that's what drove my reading forward. The final interview with Claire herself was the most intriguing. I'm not sure why the story didn't move me, but Duras is certainly near her apex with how she constructs this narrative—so seemingly simple at first, yet elegant in how it reveals its complexity via the gradual removal of layers throughout the interviews. In many ways unlike anything else of hers I've read, but still so familiar. A short novel written entirely in dialogue, Duras structures everything around three confrontational 'interviews' surrounding the gruesome murder of a deaf woman in rural France.

Like her other books, there isn't a 'plot' per se, just a tense, emotionally charged situation which she revolves obsessively around, slowly whittling away at the psychological obsessions and hang-ups of the people involved. If you only enjoy fiction that develops and resolves in clear, succinct ways, this is probably no A short novel written entirely in dialogue, Duras structures everything around three confrontational 'interviews' surrounding the gruesome murder of a deaf woman in rural France.

If you only enjoy fiction that develops and resolves in clear, succinct ways, this is probably not to your taste. Duras is interested here in charting out the twisted emotions, and the unspeakable bitterness and disappointment that accompany small-town life. While it didn't blow me away quite as much as 'The Lover' did, I think it's still hauntingly successful. If you like your french literature full of erotic darkness and inner damage, you will treasure it.

Jan 15, Garrison rated it it was amazing. I prefer a story wherein the murderer is the most reasonable and relatable character. Il y a une forte introspection psychologique. Sep 10, Susan rated it liked it Shelves: I read this novella once and was so unimpressed that I thought I must have missed something. So I went back to the first page and read it again. It's the first Duras I've read, and I just don't see why this book is praised. Claire's crime is totally without motivation. There is nothing in her character that would suggest such an horrific act, and the whole book falls apart on this one point.

The book feels more like a play than a novella it doesn't have the breadth to warrant being called a nov I read this novella once and was so unimpressed that I thought I must have missed something. The book feels more like a play than a novella it doesn't have the breadth to warrant being called a novel.

Actually, more like an annoying play, where the author didn't bother to indicate who is speaking so that you'd have to slow down. I did slow down. Twice, slowly all the way through, hoping to find what I'd missed. I think three stars is generous. I don't accept that this book is about madness. And it's not a mystery!


  • JSTOR: Access Check;
  • She Tells All?
  • ?
  • Confianza (Miscelánea nº 1) (Spanish Edition);
  • เขื่อนกั้นแปซิฟิก by Marguerite Duras (5 star ratings).

The murderer is revealed on page 12 and on the back cover summary. The only character of consequence is Pierre, and the consequence is that he's totally cold, creepy, and unlikeable. Dec 15, Jeremy rated it it was amazing. I read this book on a friend's recommendation, and honestly it took me a while to get past the first page or two. The mother who played the piano in the movie houses to be able to buy her bungalow from the colonial authorities.

The packs of sick and dying children. The fear, all the time, of poverty. The anger of the teenage brother, who hunts animals in the jungle, and rails against fate, and the mother who, finally, pimps her daughter and gives up. The corrupt officials, and how everything is bought and sold. The constant refrain of the death of children. And the predatory command of young bodies by those who are older and have money.

Apr 18, Eric Cepela rated it really liked it. Marguerite Duras is commonly thought of as a leading figure of the Nouveau Roman movement. However, this realistic novel of a widow's courageous efforts to fight corruption in the French colonial administration and to build polders to prevent her land from being flooded by the Pacific ocean is by far the best work of Duras. In the novel, the widow modelled on the author's mother ultimately fails. The author sadly notes: I was surprised when watching the marvelous movie adaption 'Un barrage contre la Pacifique' by Cambodian director Rithy Panh to see it announced at the end of the film that the polders did in fact hold and that the land was still being farmed.


  • .
  • Your Video Playbook: How To Demonstrate Your Value Through Video!
  • You have been blocked?
  • .

Read this book and then download Mr. Panh's marvellous film starring Isabelle Huppert as the gritty widow. I read this twice; the second time I liked it even more. Duras captures how being isolated and poor feels, and the isolation and poverty of a colonial family, whose head of household is a widow left to fend for her family in a traditional, patriarchal culture, would be still worse.

The family's life is evoked rather than cataloged, so the feelings of loneliness and isolation and being trapped come into the reader through tone and imagery. This is not a book for people who want comedy, though the I read this twice; the second time I liked it even more. This is not a book for people who want comedy, though there is irony in plenty. Duras writes like no one else. Her voice is simple yet eloquent, ironic.

The Sea Wall by Marguerite Duras

Al mismo tiempo, un libro donde los tres personajes principales, madre, hijo e hija, colonos blancos marginales y pobrisimos en Indochina francesa, luchan incansablemente con lo que pueden, con lo que poco que tienen, contra la adversidad implacable que los rodea: Apr 12, Peter rated it really liked it. I've read most of Margueritte Duras's books, and this is probably my favorite, besides maybe Summer Rain, and it's a more involved story than that.

I like her writing because the prose feels really spare, and you kind of read along in the story waiting to see where it's going to go, and then you find that you're in the middle of the story and it's simpler and deeper than you thought. She writes with a tone of romantic longing, but it's mixed with an almost Samuel Beckett like post-apocalyptic se I've read most of Margueritte Duras's books, and this is probably my favorite, besides maybe Summer Rain, and it's a more involved story than that.

The Sea Wall

She writes with a tone of romantic longing, but it's mixed with an almost Samuel Beckett like post-apocalyptic sense. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. She was born at Gia-Dinh, near Saigon, French Indochina now Vietnam , after her parents responded to a campaign by the French government encouraging people to work in the colony. Marguerite's father fell ill soon after their arrival, and returned to France, where he died. After his death, her mother, a teacher, remained in Indochina with her three children.

The difficult life that the family experienced during this period was highly influential on Marguerite's later work.

Marguerite Duras (3/4) : La folie du voir

At 17, Marguerite went to France, her parents' native country, where she began studying for a degree in mathematics. This she soon abandoned to concentrate on political sciences, and then law.

เขื่อนกั้นแปซิฟิก

After completing her studies, she became an active member of the PCF the French Communist Party and was engaged in the resistance. She is the author of a great many novels, plays, films, interviews and short narratives, including her best-selling, apparently autobiographical work L'Amant , translated into English as The Lover.

This text won the Goncourt prize in The story of her adolescence also appears in three other forms: A film version of The Lover, produced by Claude Berri, was released to great success in Stein, and her film India Song. She was also the screenwriter of the French film Hiroshima mon amour, which was directed by Alain Resnais. Duras's early novels were fairly conventional in form their 'romanticism' was criticised by fellow writer Raymond Queneau ; however, with Moderato Cantabile she became more experimental, paring down her texts to give ever-increasing importance to what was not said.

She was associated with the Nouveau roman French literary movement, although did not definitively belong to any group. Her films are also experimental in form, most eschewing synch sound, using voice over to allude to, rather than tell, a story over images whose relation to what is said may be more-or-less tangential.

See a Problem?

Marguerite's adult life was somewhat difficult, despite her success as a writer, and she was known for her periods of alcoholism. Her tomb is marked simply 'MD'. Books by Marguerite Duras. See All Goodreads Deals…. Trivia About The Sea Wall.