e-book Here Is Where: Discovering Americas Great Forgotten History

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But to the best of my knowledge, no one has done this before. Here is Where is a captivating, thoroughly enjoyable journey across the country with a friend who knows all the cool places to stop and have a look. This is a terrific book: Buy the Audiobook Download: Apple Audible downpour eMusic audiobooks. Add to Cart Add to Cart. Also by Andrew Carroll. See all books by Andrew Carroll.

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Read an excerpt from Here Is Where. Looking for More Great Reads? Download our Spring Fiction Sampler Now. LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices. I didn't realise that Al Capone's older brother was a federal agent, or that electronic television was invented by a year-old ploughing his family's farm, or that an African-American woman named Irene Morgan refused to give up her bus seat some 11 years before Rosa Parks famously did.

It's the kind of book I found myself reading aloud to people, reciting facts preceded by an surprised 'did you know? A light holiday kind of read. I only wish I'd saved it for my actual holiday. Jul 04, Martha rated it it was amazing. This is a charming review of people, places, and events in U. The author's passion for his subject is contagious, the chapters are relatively short, and the information he presents is well organized.

He's got a real talent for finding common threads in events and people that seem at first disparate. This is, no doubt, the result of the extensive research he did which led him from plac This is a charming review of people, places, and events in U. This is, no doubt, the result of the extensive research he did which led him from place to place and opened up more stories as he went. Now my head is filled with odd facts that I hope will make me the life of the next party I attend. My favorites were the section on the Spanish Flu, the history of the elevator and the Otis name, and the story of the mine riot in Rock Springs, Wyoming that left two dozen Chinese immigrants dead and the interesting connection between this town and Dick Cheney.

The stories are well told and the author has a glint of humor in his eye as he looks around on his journey. May 19, Paul Waibel rated it it was amazing. I lived in Lynchburg, Virginia during the s while in high school and college. I left after graduating from Lynchburg College in I returned eleven years later for a brief four years. During those four years I discovered things about Lynchburg's history that I was unaware of while living there in the sixties.

I did not know, for example, that Thomas Jefferson's summer home, Poplar Forest, was located in one of the city's western suburbs. Neither did I know that a large house up on one of I lived in Lynchburg, Virginia during the s while in high school and college. Neither did I know that a large house up on one of the hills overlooking the city was once the home of the doctor who gave Patrick Henry a fatal dose of mercury medicine. George Cabell warned Henry that it might be fatal, but Henry insisted on taking it.

Both Popular Forest and Point of Honor are now tourist attractions; neither was when I lived in the area. My point is simply this.

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We often live near locations of historical significance without knowing it, often because no one ever bothered to erect a marker. Crown Archetype, , brings to light many interesting, and often overlooked, individuals and events in America's history. Carroll does so by visiting the sites associated with the people and events. Often those living nearby were unaware of what took place there until Carroll showed up asking questions. The stories uncovered by Carroll are more interesting than they are of historical importance.

A visit to some "lush green bean fields" in western Indiana is the setting for an account of Horace Greeley's involvement in an attempt to establish the utopian community known as the Grand Prairie Harmonical Association. Nothing is left of the community, or should we say commune, except bean fields. Not everyone would be happy with Carroll's reviving memories of individuals or events many Americans, especially those living in their shadow, would rather remain hidden in the back of history's closet.

One example is Carroll's visit to California's redwoods in search of any tribute to Madison Grant, one of America's early conservationists. Given the popularity of environmental issues today, it is remarkable that almost no one is aware of the fact that one of the three men responsible for saving the giant redwoods of California was a man named Madison Grant. In fact, there is only a small bronze plaque in California's Redwoods State Park that pays tribute to this great conservationist and defender of America's natural beauty.

There are three names listed on the plaque. They are Madison Grant, John C. Most of those who by some accident happen to see the plaque and read it have no idea who any of the three men were. A few do, and some of them are aghast at any mention of Madison Grant, especially in a favorable light. Not only was Grant a conservationist, he was also the author of a very popular book advocating the now discredited pseudoscience known as eugenics. Eugenics was an attempt of give scientific credibility to the idea of breeding a "master race. Not everyone will find every article equally interesting, but there is more than a little here for anyone who enjoys reading about one of the most interesting of topics, history.

Sep 17, Jason rated it it was amazing Shelves: If you are looking for an informative read on American history regarding important people and events that get undeservedly overlooked, Andrew Carroll's "Here Is Where: Discovering America's Forgotten History" provides the material you seek. Carroll enlightens the reader with multitudinous information, engages his audience to reflect and consider pivotal moments in time, and illustrates for us all how fragile one's legacy, no matter how impactful, can become.

Carroll provides plenty of amusing and If you are looking for an informative read on American history regarding important people and events that get undeservedly overlooked, Andrew Carroll's "Here Is Where: Carroll provides plenty of amusing and startling moments in discussing America's explorations, immigrations, medicinal and technological advances, judicial advancements, and much more. He takes the reader on a journey to America's four out-stretched corners—western Hawaii to northern Alaska, eastern Maine to southern Florida—and plenty of points in-between, cacophonously urban and serenely rural.

He introduces us to everyday Americans past and present: A tiny Alaskan village's cemetery played a crucial role in fighting the Spanish flu. A small farmhouse in Idaho sheltered a boy who conceived how to create the home television. A national park in Nevada is home to Prometheus, who was born before the Great Pyramids were built and died only recently.

A Philadelphia bookstore unknowingly possessed one of the few and rare original copies of the Declaration of Independence, and now the only existing copy on permanent, year-round public display. An empty field in Utah played landing site for one of America's most daring airplane hijackers. A town in Ohio, though found on maps, doesn't exist. Carroll discusses many other spots of like consequence, all engrossing and all worthy of note.

Houses, graves, laboratories, islands, theaters, town squares, alleys, mountainsides, patches of woods, military bases, riverbanks, shops, etc. Overshadowed by other, more famous events, or by politics, or even because of shame, these sites hold importance in winning our wars, curing our pandemic diseases, shaping our national policies, and advancing our sciences, to name a few points of profundity.

What is heartbreaking about it all, as Carroll deftly relates, is how little our society cherishes and honors some of our most important people, institutions, and locales.


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Ironically perhaps, Carroll leaves us pondering a question: I am glad to have received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review. I look forward to reading Mr. Carroll's other books already available in bookstores and his future works. Apr 25, Bronwyn rated it it was amazing Shelves: I really enjoyed this book.

Carroll went around the U. Some of these sections I enjoyed more than others. I didn't enjoy the medical section as mu Won through Goodreads. I didn't enjoy the medical section as much, but that is because I'm not very interested in it, not because it wasn't interesting. My favorite section was the historical preservation chapter where Carroll discusses the Dunlap broadsides, the Alamo, and more. Also, the chapter on Philo Farnsworth was really interesting; I knew a little about him because of Warehouse 13, but that was it.

It was great to learn more about him, and I really felt sorry for him overall. My only criticism of the book would be that the chapter headings don't always really reflect what the chapter is about. The place that the title is for may just be the jumping off point to discuss something else overall e. The Leary Bookshop is just a way to talk about the Dunlap broadsides and the preservation of them, or lack thereof.

This isn't necessarily a bad thing, all of the tangents Carroll goes on are fascinating, but I sometimes wished to know a bit more about the place that the chapter was supposed to be about. Another slight criticism would be that the quotes used at the beginning of each chapter didn't always make sense to me, but if I read them again it might become clear. Overall, a very interesting book about things people should know more about. I would recommend this to everyone, especially those interested in American history or lesser known history.

Jul 26, Christopher rated it it was amazing Shelves: Wonderful account of Carroll's visits to many lesser-known or practically unknown historical sites around the United States and the research that went into them. His style is a little bit like Sarah Vowell's, especially in his regard for the obscure, humble underdogs who never made it into the history books and who deserve at least a historical marker.

My favorite chapters include the ones on Elisha Otis yes, the founder of Otis elevators and inventor of the safety brake for elevators , Rober Wonderful account of Carroll's visits to many lesser-known or practically unknown historical sites around the United States and the research that went into them. My favorite chapters include the ones on Elisha Otis yes, the founder of Otis elevators and inventor of the safety brake for elevators , Robert Goddard, and Dr.

Discovering America’s Great Forgotten History

Loring Miner he was the first physician to warn of the Spanish influenza epidemic in a good tie-in for Dan Brown's "Inferno", which I'm reading now. While he's a lot less snarky than Vowell, his understated and often self-deprecating humor comes through enough for you to see that he would be a great tour guide for the ultimate history geek road trip. May 29, Your Excellency rated it really liked it Shelves: This book is much more than the History Lite that seems to be popular today.

Although the author skips around figuratively and actually from location to location, he provides a great deal of depth on each of his topics. Each is entertaining and yes, I must say educational, and Mr. Carroll sheds new light on many 'old' things. Not just chewing gum for the mind, this one. I especially liked the small connections he makes between one event and others in his book - it's like finding a little thre This book is much more than the History Lite that seems to be popular today.

I especially liked the small connections he makes between one event and others in his book - it's like finding a little thread that, when you pull it, opens a hidden door to another secret compartment. I'm reminded of a great British TV series, hosted by James Burke, which aired episodes in , , and He would spin these amazing webs of connections between disparate events, and follow them wherever they led.

Aug 20, Patricia rated it it was amazing. The best compliment I can give to this book is that I hope the author will soon write another one! A fascinating exploration of little known historical episodes in American history told through the author's trips to the places where they occurred.

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He manages to weave a little suspense into the stories and makes some wonderful points about the value of knowing our history. My favorite stories were the medical ones but all of it was really interesting. His willingness to share his personal quirks The best compliment I can give to this book is that I hope the author will soon write another one! His willingness to share his personal quirks adds to the enjoyment. He outlined over 16 stories in the acknowledgements that didn't make it into this book but I hope they will make it into the next one!

Jul 27, Ryan rated it really liked it. If you didn't know that Edwin Booth saved the life of Robert Todd Lincoln, months before his brother assassinated President Lincoln, you aren't alone. I had no clue, and that's the point of this book. The author, Andrew Carroll, who had files upon files of little know historical oddities, decided to travel the United States, visiting the sites of pivotal points in American history, that most of us have forgotten about.

And forgotten is probably not the right word, let's just say this book is ful If you didn't know that Edwin Booth saved the life of Robert Todd Lincoln, months before his brother assassinated President Lincoln, you aren't alone. And forgotten is probably not the right word, let's just say this book is full of events and people that most of us never heard about, though we should have. He had a few self imposed criteria. They had to be sites that were nationally important, not just some fun local event that didn't have that much of an impact, outside of the neighborhood it took place in.

But most importantly, they had to be unmarked, which most of the time, meant they were forgotten. But this isn't just a book full of unconnected events and the personalities involved, instead its a travelogue that celebrates this country's past, and honors those that are trying to preserve it. The author isn't just slapping down some dates and names, he's letting us in on the journey, allowing us to share in the discovery, to revel in our collective history. Each trip is a separate journey, and we are right there with him, as he visits the sites and talks to the locals, gleaning information from everyone he meets.

You can feel the reverence and even the awe that he feels at times, being on location, where those we should honor, gave up their lives or fulfilled a life time of accomplishments. He starts us off in Hawaii, not the most logical choice, nor his first choice. Rather he is forced to accommodate his journey, to meet the demands of where he is going. And it's with Hawaii that my studying began.

I was unaware of how a kamikaze pilot crash landed on the small island of Niihau. Nor did I know of his capture by the locals, and how some trusted members of the community, who happened to be of Japanese heritage, tried to help him in escaping. It's that incident that helped cement the distrust of Japanese Americans, and helped to land them in internment camps for the remainder of World War II. What follows is a state by state tour, exploring other such events. But he doesn't go off willy nilly, or even follow in a way that makes the most geographical sense.

Instead he breaks the stops down into categories, using these events and places to explore broader themes running throughout our history. He visits those who are trying to figure out who was here before us.

"Here is Where: Discovering America's Great Forgotten History," by Andrew Carroll - CBS News

He delves into the darker side of expansion, discovery and growth. He visits the homes of men and women who pushed our country forward through innovation and science. He even touches upon the future, how our past teaches us about what is to come, and how there are those who are trying to preserve it for those generations to come.

I live in Kansas, but haven't been into the Western part of the state, I always knew that I never wanted to take a trip to Sublette. Nov 18, Dave rated it it was amazing Shelves: It encourages respect and empathy. It fosters creativity and stimulates the imagination. Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers.

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