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Download our Spring Fiction Sampler Now. LitFlash The eBooks you want at the lowest prices. Read it Forward Read it first. The second is much better: The 'famous alumni' type interview done with his college newspaper could easily have been stilted, having been done by letter, but has some interesting material about his writing process and his feelings about, and approach towards, interviews. And the interview by Dave Eggers for the November Believer is actually great fun. Not only does it swing wildly from high concept mathematics, to the process of writing and planning one's writing, to the increasingly ugly, partisan political discourse in America led by self serving pundits on both sides yes, this was apparently a scary problem as far back as , [sigh] , but it also has one of those great tones of 'two writers talking.

David Foster Wallace The Last Interview and Other Conversations The Last Interview Series

I won't say that this book left me with any new revelations on one of my favorite authors. I can't say there was anything really earth shattering contained here, or any interviewing masterpieces that show how it's really done. But at the end of the day, despite my suspicions and misgivings, I enjoyed this book. And it helped me to expand my understanding of David Foster Wallace, who meant a great deal to me. Apr 06, Tomas Psorn rated it really liked it. The book is everything but complex, anyway, it reveals little by little a tiny piece of Mr. Wallace's inner picture, which complex works might fail to deliver.

It reveals incredible stories like a bag of pot for a bus driver , as well as it brings a unique point of view on many things just by the way. Also, the interview format, which appears quite raw after a while, helps here. It exposes his thinking in a different way than his polished, edited, many times rewritten work. Even if he fully und The book is everything but complex, anyway, it reveals little by little a tiny piece of Mr. Even if he fully understands the question and answers it in a very complex, yet comprehensible way, he mostly ends up saying his classical "I doubt, it does make any sense at all".

Nov 22, Skyler rated it liked it. It's interesting to hear DFW in these interviews. The others, not so much. I think the best part of these interviews is not that it's a peek inside DFW's mind, which, if you think this book's is going to provide, it may only a little, but rather the book recommendations and when Wallace rambles off what it is he's reading, or what his 'influences' are.

This is not a review. In my opinion it's far more difficult to write a review of something that you don't like because if you're a fiction writer you know how hard you work even on something really crummy to somebody else. It feels ironic to even attempt a book review for these interviews; DFW made it very clear on how he feels about reviewing. I'm not certain if those were even his feelings or just the This is not a review. I'm not certain if those were even his feelings or just the intellectual thought process for which he provided. This is in no way intended to be disrespectful, but just the thoughtful notion of continuing on for how I feel for this book makes me think that Wallace is turning over in his grave when someone like me is going against the very concept he was establishing in his interviews and works of fiction.

I've never read any of his writings, but I've always been curious and they're definitely in my TBR pile. Especially after taking a glimpse into the tiny fraction of how he perceived the world. It's disheartening to read, coming from his own mouth, that he wanted to live over the age of 50 with his health-habits.

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But he was definitely right about this In all honesty, I have no idea what you went through or how you felt or thought. But I thank you for leaving behind some great works of art that I can enjoy down the road. If I were to imagine you doing something that makes you happy, that would be to imagine your reaction to seeing your own drawings of "smiley faces". The part of us that can really wholeheartedly weep at stuff, and the part of us that has to live in a world of smart, jaded, sophisticated people and wants very much to be taken seriously by those people. I don't know that it's that irony tyrannizes us, but the fashions that are so easy to criticize but are so incredibly powerful and authentic-seeming when we're inside them, tyrannize us.

I don't know that it's ever been any different. That probably makes absolute no sense. View all 10 comments. Jan 04, Jon rated it really liked it. I highlighted many sections in this book, including these parts about sadness: I was white, upper-middle-class, obscenely well-educated, had had way more career success than I could have legitimately hoped for and was sort of adrift.

A lot of my friends were the same way. Some of them were deeply into drugs, others were unbelievable workaholics. Some were going to singles bars e I highlighted many sections in this book, including these parts about sadness: Some were going to singles bars every night. You could see it played out in 20 different ways, but it's the same thing. Some of my friends got into AA. I went to a couple of meetings with these guys and thought that it was tremendously powerful. That part of the book is supposed to be living enough to be realistic, but it's also supposed to stand for a response to lostness and what you do when the things you thought were going to make you OK, don't.

The bottoming out with drugs and the AA response to that was the starkest thing that I could find to talk about that. I get the feeling that a lot of us, privileged Americans as we enter our early 30s, have to find a way to put away childish things and confront stuff about spirituality and values. Probably the AA model isn't the only way to do it, but it seems to me to be one of the vigorous.

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Jul 15, Andrew added it Shelves: A slender volume of interviews, at least one of which I'd definitely read before. Almost a classic example of a "completists only" book. It wasn't that I didn't enjoy the interviews, I did, and I got some book recommendations out of them, but that's about it. If a copy comes your way, feel free to pick it up, it's distracting, but definitely not worth going out and buying, especially when they'll charge ya 15 bucks for pages -- although it's nowhere near as exorbitant as the publishing indus A slender volume of interviews, at least one of which I'd definitely read before.

If a copy comes your way, feel free to pick it up, it's distracting, but definitely not worth going out and buying, especially when they'll charge ya 15 bucks for pages -- although it's nowhere near as exorbitant as the publishing industry's post-mortem swindle known as This Is Water. May 10, Tom Dolan rated it liked it Shelves: I labored under the delusion that this whole book was a big interview -- it's not. It's collected interviews most of which I already have or have read and the unpublished "last" interview is a page and half or so.

Added to the DFW stack. Feb 28, Jamie Cattanach rated it it was amazing. Fantastic insight into one of my favorite writers and people, who speaks at length here about how to best be a writer or a people in the twenty-first century. Couldn't put it down.

David Foster Wallce: The Last Interview : David Foster Wallace :

So sad we lost him. Sep 14, John rated it really liked it. Some of it are really boring. But our DFW-guy ain't give no shit, coz Everything about him is a gift. Aug 18, Wendy Liu added it Shelves: Of the six interviews, four of them are also found in Conversations with David Foster Wallace ; the only two new ones are the one with Dave Eggers and the one with Stacey Schmediel, neither of which really stands out compared to his more famous interviews.

This book is probably only worth getting if, like me, you're obsessively trying to complete your personal collection of books by and on David Foster Wallace. Jun 09, Joe rated it liked it. There are a couple of interesting sections though, and you get a better feel for what the author was like outside of his narrator persona.

It's short enough that if you are a fan, you should read this. Nov 02, JuneAutumn rated it liked it. Ein paar richtig geniale Sachen, aber manche Interviewer waren wirklich schlecht, und das merkt man DFW auch an. Dennoch bin ich immer wieder verliebt in die Klugheit dieses Menschen Dec 31, Travis rated it really liked it. A humility comes through in his interviews that is harder to see in his writing. Made me like him more as a dude.

Oct 21, Laurann rated it it was amazing Shelves: I wish he was still here. The last sentence got me. May 27, tisasday rated it really liked it.

I'm convinced, infinite jest. Aug 02, Niklas Pivic rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a collection of interviews with David Foster Wallace, which is published posthumously. DFW does these interviews either face-to-face or by e-mail which he perfers, as he refers to himself as a "five-draft man". On " Infinite Jest ": What were you intending to do when you started this book? I wanted to do something sad. One person found this helpful. The book provides further info about DFW--lots of things that I haven't read anywhere else. I found it especially interesting reading the difference between the interviews that were premeditated e.

There are many interviews included and the quality varies. Surprisingly, I found his "last interview" to be the least interesting. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. I liked seeing several perspectives of a Mr. Wallace, and hearing them in his own voice. I'd recommend this obviously to any fans of Mr.

Wallace who still, like me, miss him. Wallace and who would like to learn more about him and his work before delving into his writing. I gave it 5 stars because the quality of the interviewing and responses started high and stayed that way. These interviews were as incisive and as interesting as his essays. The book was like having a conversation with the man, except the interviewers held up their end much better than I could have. I heartily recommend this to anyone who has some familiarity with DFW's works. See all 17 reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers.

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